Why People Don’t Seek Mental Health Treatment

Because of the increase of school shootings across the United States, there is an ongoing debate regarding solutions. One of the most looked at causes behind mass shootings are the mental state of the shooters themselves. Most mass shooters have some things in common with each other.

1. Grew up in a fatherless home

2. Was on prescription psychotropic drugs

3. Had stressful events going on in their lives

For category #1, the solutions are obvious. We need to revamp the family law courts in way that there aren’t “winning” parents and “losing” parents. I speak about this topic in-depth in my published report sent to the U.N. titled, “Global Human Trafficking in The Family Law Courts”, which can be found on Amazon.

However, for the sake of this article, I want to focus on the mental health aspect. It is undeniable that our school systems and our healthcare systems are handing out psychotropic drugs like candy! Kids who aren’t paying attention in class are quickly prescribed Ritalin. Depressed teenagers are quickly give Prozac; the situation for adults isn’t much better.

Let’s look at modern rappers like, “Lil Xan”, “Future”, and the recently deceased 20 year old rapper, “Lil Peep”, who died from a Xanax pill laced with Fentanyl. The rapper was seen on Instagram frequently swallowing hand fulls of Xanax pills daily. His young fans who idolized him are most likely following suit.

According to the “business-insider” news site, the United States of America is the world’s leader in prescribing anti-depressant medication. According to one of its articles published, it was found that 12% of all Americans are on some type of drug used to treat mental illness.

There are pros and cons to these numbers. Take South Korea for example, a very developed nation, yet it is ranked #3 for suicides. In the Korean culture, seeing a doctor for depression is a social stigma that shows weakness, especially on part of a male. It isn’t surprising considering that 80% of all suicides in the world are attributed to men. Because mental illness is pretty much ignored in South Korea and among males in general due to society pressures to remain “stoic”, people are killing themselves left and right.

On the other hand, the United States, which is ranked between #30 – #40 (depending on the study), for suicides. So, there is some evidence that perhaps anti-depressant medications can work. Or is it merely cultural? Jamaica often ranks at the very bottom of the list for suicide rates despite being a poor country. Although the poor, the communities are very close knit, and their culture is very cheerful. Perhaps it’s because marijuana is legal to smoke in the country! Who knows!

But, I do know one thing; anti-depressants and other drugs used to treat mental illness carry many side-effects. “Suicidal Thoughts”, is often listed as one of the major side-effects of Prozac. Imagine that! A medication designed for suicidal people which may cause suicidal thoughts! There is no doubt that taking psychotropic drugs alters the brain chemistry, just like alcohol or any other intoxicant.

It is in my opinion that occupational therapy, talk therapy, and community interaction are among the best treatments for depression. However, yet again, there is a draw back to these types of therapies as well.

Anytime an American sees a counselor for depression, suicidal thoughts, or any mental health concern, they are then “logged” and “stereotyped”. Those who frequent a mental health counselor could have such activities used against them in a custody battle or those who seek to purchase a firearm.

Imagine you are battling depression, so you go see a counselor, only to have it used against you in the future. This is why many, myself included, fear the idea of seeing a mental health specialist during times of great stress. Once you visit these people, you are very “labeled” and will be “marked”. If you find yourself facing any future litigation, the courts can uncover your medical records whereas they will say,:

“Ahhh! You went to a mental health counselor several times for depression! You aren’t fit to own a gun or have custody of your kids!”.

In some cases, this may true, whereas in others, it could be an unfair stereotype. When people mentioned that they see a counselor or take anti-depressant medication, people will often sneer at you or perhaps take a step back. We associate mental health concerns with schizophrenia or severe manic depressive types. The fact is, we are all suffering with some form of mental illness.

If you are too happy, the doctors will say you are “manic”. If you are too grumpy, they will say you have “type A” personality. If you are too sad, they will say you are suffering from severe “Depression”. It is much like going to a mechanic. If you talk long enough, they will find something wrong with you!

The truth is simple. Visiting a mental health counselor could result in you losing rights to your child, to your firearms, and your reputation as a person. It is a sad truth. Under our current system, most people do not seek help for fear of being demonized.

The top ways we can prevent mass shootings is by encouraging a friendly community, surround yourself with loving people, do your best to be involved parents, seek natural therapies to mental health disorders over drugs if possible (Sports, work therapy, etc..). If you are hearing voices or are frequently attempting to complete your suicide, then you should certainly seek medical intention.

Requiring mental health screenings to purchase firearms sounds like a great idea until you realize that most don’t seek help so that they can purchase a firearm! Why not screen people’s health condition before they purchase alcohol, get a driver’s license, or board a plane? Mental health can make nearly any activity dangerous. Our country must stop looking for “quick” fixes and start looking at the true cause of our demise.

Our fast-food, sex-violence, entertainment, glorification of misunderstand anarchism. There is “freedom” and then there is “responsible” freedom. Make choices in life, however, make those choices in respect of how it will affect your society at large. Legislators cannot solve these issues. These issues are ones that will require families to step up, unite, and take back the reign of traditional values without going overboard.

A middle ground between progressive thought and traditional values must be balanced. We mustn’t be afraid to advance our society, but we must also not totally disregard traditional ways of living which have served our humanity for so long.

Lastly, we must encourage more anonymity within our mental health departments. Must like the “confessionals” at a Catholic church. If people can be anonymously treated without so much of a paper-trail to stigmatize them, I am sure that many more people would step forward and ask for help.

As a boxing coach, this job often requires me to be a counselor, talking with my students, building up their confidence. If you are depressed and need help, but do not trust or fear doctors, a great alternative in my opinion is to stay active in group settings. Building relationships are essential in combating mental illness. In poor countries, suicide rates are often low because their communities are so tight knit. They may be poor, but no one is as lonely as the isolated modern man who types away in his cold artificially lit office cubicle.

Good Vices That Benefit Our Health

VICE #1: Sleeping in.

It’s free, natural and has no drawbacks. More than giving you energy, getting enough quality sleep boosts your immune system, your memory and might even help you manage your weight. Lack of sleep has been linked to high blood pressure, glucose intolerance and belly fat, all known to be risk factors for heart disease. You should aim for the research supported 7 to 8 hours of sleep each night. If you always seem to drag yourself out of bed, no matter how much sleep you get the night before, talk to your doctor. A good night’s sleep is not a luxury… it’s necessary to your health and well-being.

VICE #2: Mental health days.

Who doesn’t enjoy sneaking off for a well deserved time out? Turns out taking time off has been shown by research to relieve stress, lowering your blood pressure and thus your risk for heart disease. It also aids creative thinking, and may help with symptoms of depression. The good news is that the length of the vacation doesn’t matter one bit in terms of how happy it will make you. The best part is the anticipation.

VICE #3: Enjoying intimate pleasures.

A vice in some eyes to be sure… sex is, after all, the most pleasurable form of activity there is. It releases feel-good endorphins and oxytocin, the hormone that helps promote attachment, which very much benefits mental health. One study found that those who were sexually active one or two times a week had raised levels of the antibody immunoglobulin A that is thought to protect from colds and infections. As with many vices, sexual activity brings the chance for unintended consequences like infections and pregnancy, which is why it does not top the list.

VICE #4: A daily serving of chocolate.

A worthy, well loved vice. A square or two of the dark kind, without as much sugar and fat as milk chocolate, will do wonders. Dark chocolate and cocoa (75% cocoa content) might help lower blood pressure, cut the risk of stroke and bring other cardiovascular benefits according to more than one study. Dark chocolate has flavonoids that are believed to improve the flexibility of blood vessels, making them more resistant to plaque buildup.

Another study published last year found that eating 1.4 ounces of dark chocolate a day for 14 days reduced the stress hormones in highly anxious people.

VICE #5: Girls/Boys nights out.

Finally, research to back up a vice we all enjoy. A number of recent studies have shown how big an impact friends and family have on our behavior. From what we eat and drink, to how much we weigh (for better or worse). Strong social ties have also been found to bring benefits like fewer colds, better brain health and a longer life. Friendships are so good for you, as long as you’re in a well-balanced relationship with give and take being equal. Avoid those who are toxic to you.

VICE #6: Full fat dressing/sauces.

When it comes to vices, full fat anything is sure to be on the list. The thing is, there’s really no need for you to deprive yourself of the full fat variety of your favorite dressing or sauce. These “loaded” versions not only taste better, but they remind us that fats serve a real health purpose, as long as you get the right kinds in the right amount. Try for 10% (no more than 30%) of your daily fat intake to come from monounsaturated fats (vegetable oils, avocados, many nuts and seeds) that cut your risk of heart disease and stroke.

Omega-3 fatty acids (salmon and tuna, flaxseed and walnuts) also reduce the risk of heart disease and might even help ease symptoms of depression, rheumatoid arthritis and other problems. A meal that has a little fat leaves you feeling more satisfied, so you end up actually eating less.

VICE #7: Your morning coffee.

One of the most well known of the vices, coffee continues to be popular. If you’re like many who need that cup of coffee to get going in the morning, don’t feel guilty. There’s a lot of research that suggests coffee doesn’t just pick you up, it also fights heart disease and some cancers. It might also help you perform harder, longer workouts. Moderate coffee drinking in midlife has been linked to lower risks of dementia and Alzheimer’s. What’s more, every added cup of coffee you drink a day drops your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 7%.

VICE #8: Getting a massage.

They may be an expensive indulgence, but massages (by a pro or a loved one) are a vice that is well worth the guilt. Being touched regularly leaves you healthier. Women in a 2008 study noted less pain, depression, anxiety and anger when they got weekly massages by their partners. Their partners reported better mental health too.

VICE #9: Basking in the sun.

Though we all know the dangers of too much sun, this vice, in moderation, has its good side. Those sun filled days act as a natural anti-depressant, really working to improve moods. It triggers our bodies to cut production of the sleep stimulating hormone melatonin so we feel alert, energized and ready to take on the day. Letting the skin soak up the sun (without sunscreen) also triggers the natural synthesis of vitamin D, believed to reduce risks for cancer, heart disease, brittle bones and other conditions.

VICE #10: Wine with dinner.

Last but not least, the ‘good’ vice that most hinges on moderation. Though researchers don’t know precisely why it works, wine does have some impressive heart healthy properties. The antioxidants may keep blood vessels flexible, or alcohol could help boost HDL (the good) cholesterol. All you need is one 5 ounce glass a day to enjoy the benefit, more than this can up your blood pressure and cause you to pack on pounds. Women who drink heavily also boost their risk of breast cancer.

3 Ways to Beat the Blues This Season for Winter Health

Do you feel depressed and low-energy during winter’s dark days? What you have is most likely not S.A.D. (Seasonal Affective Disorder), which is literally a medical condition similar to clinical depression. You likely just have a milder condition: seasonal depression. And that’s good news because? Because it’s easy to beat with three simple steps:

1. Light, light, light! Use full-spectrum light-bulbs in your home and at work, wherever possible, then add a “happy light’ – You can’t afford not to. What is your good mood worth to you? You can read or make phone calls or do whatever you wish near the light box or put it at your work desk. Also, once a month, try the new UV safe tanning beds. Not to tan, just to get the light your body needs.

Take a minivacation and close your eyes each day for a minute by your light box and imagine you are in Hawaii or another sunny destination… you may just find yourself there on a quick vacation! But in the meantime, you’ll feel better. Imagine yourself immersed in joy… that will help, too!

2. Stay active. You may think winter is for hibernating, but if you do, hibernate actively! I do Zumba at home by my sunny window and alternates with swimming at an indoor pool that has lots of light coming in during the morning hours. Exercise is a magic-pill you have to earn by sweat! Also, be sure to get enough good sleep in order to have the energy you need to work out.

Are you doing the kind of exercise you love? If you are, then you’re motivated to exercise more. Do you love to exercise alone or in a group? Do you need others to push you along or sweat with you? Do you need a firmly scheduled class? If so, you know what to do… join one!

Don’t have time? Just imagine exercising and you’ll find yourself having time! Do this visualization as you wake up in the morning or just as you are falling asleep at night, and whenever you feel guilty about not exercising! People have actually toned up just by imagining it, but you will likely find yourself at the gym, walking at lunchtime, or wherever/whenever you can best get your workout. The subconscious is a powerful tool to help you in your daily life. Just keep speaking its language-images!

3. Vitamin D-3 helps a lot – If you can’t get enough real sunlight, and even if you can, take D-3 in a form that is easy to absorb and utilize by your body. If you could only take one supplement with you on a long journey, I’ve heard that vitamin D-3 is the one to take with you. Yes, even over vitamin C.

Mental Health – Depression

The early stage of depression is very important. Most people quietly suffer depression and are never diagnosed, while some treat themselves without them knowing by adjusting to nature and exploring their chances of hope.

We all feel depressed sometimes but get well over time. After all, being sad is a part of living, we can’t all have it good all the time.

Depression is an illness that affects both the mental state and mind. It affects the way you feel and think, increasing your thought of hopelessness and sadness.

The majority of people will suffer from depression at least once in their lifetime, this could be from grief, stress or illness which can lead from mild depression to severe depression.

What causes depression:

Research shows that the brain plays an important role regulating our mood, this could have a major impact on depression, but some factors contribute, including change in hormones, where the body cannot manage stress and experience positives mood.

Who can have depression:

Depression can happen to anyone at any age, depression is an illness of mental state. Appropriate therapy for mood swings in children and teenagers will reduce the chances of having depression.

Symptoms of depression:

o Inability to think or concentrate

o Hopelessness

o Inability to make decisions

o Guilt

o Changes in sleep

o Loss of interest

o Loss of energy

o Sadness

o Suicidal thoughts

o Weight gain

Unfortunately Depression is common and a serious illness. Immediate help or treatment is advisable.

The majority of people will suffer from depression at least once in their lifetime.

Cure for depression:

As depression is an illness of the mental health, there are lots ways symptoms can be cured

o Antidepressant: It’s a popular treatment for depression. There are over 30 types of antidepressants tablets, if one doesn’t relieve your symptoms, you can always try another one and chances are you will find one that works well for you.

o Exercise: it’s one of the natural ways of reducing the symptoms of depression and there is evidence that it helps in improving your motivation and mood.

o Religion: This is the most common and natural way of totally curing depression. Majority of people choose religions as their choice of depression treatment. Most religion preaches faith that gives hope to believers, Even though religion can bring guilt of past troubles, after all memories are the only treasure that cannot be changed but remembering the hope of forgiveness elevates the mood and mental state.

Research shows that 90% of people suffering from depression in Africa are not diagnosed. Are you suffering from depression, or do you know anyone suffering from depression? Talk to someone today, it helps. Talk to us today.